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I thought I was being rather 21st century at the store recently as I pulled out my iPhone 4 with a photo of a scanned bar code to get my 20% discount at the cash register. The friendly register girl said, “Wow, you still have one of those?”

I checked my hand to make sure I didn’t accidentally pull my pet Triceratops out of my pocket by mistake. But no, it was my telephonic marvel of technology that was no bigger than a deck of cards.

My instant reaction then was to say, “I have T-shirts older than you.” (In fact, I would likely have socks older than you too if it not for my wife periodically culling through my sock drawer and weeding out the holey ones or do you call them holy ones.)

But, I took the high road and said, “This old rag? Humph. My regular phone is in the shop.”

And then I thought, my goodness, how quickly things become obsolete these days. Research revealed that the iPhone 4 was first released in the United States on June 24, 2010, LESS THAN FIVE YEARS AGO and here’s a person acting like I pulled an 8 track player out of my pocket.

(For those of you who don’t know what an 8 track player is, I am NOT going to explain it to you. Why you may ask? 1) I don’t even understand how it worked. 2) If you don’t know what it is, you could never conceptualize any explanation of this devise.)

Troubled by this, I learned that since my iPhone 4 was released (way back when 8-Track players roamed the earth in cars the size of ocean liners), there have been 137 new versions of the iPhone. In fact, they actually released 2 more versions, check that 3 more versions as I was typing this article. OK, maybe not that many, but there have been a lot. I think they’re all the way up to Version 8.0 now.

Pretty soon there will be more phone versions that the XLIX versions of the Super Bowl.

Gotta run. My typing fingers are sore cause they got stuck in my rotary dial phone when I had to chase my pet Triceratops out to the yard before he has a massive accident of pre-historic proportions in the kitchen. Thanks for reading.

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